Course Description

Linguistics 1: Introduction to Study of Language, LING 1

Summary, for general undergraduates, of what is known about human language; unique nature of human language, its structure, its universality, and its diversity; language in its social and cultural setting; language in relation to other aspects of human inquiry and knowledge.

Key Information

Credit: 5 quarter units / 3.33 semester units credit
UC Los Angeles, Linguistics

Course Credit:

Upon successful completion, all online courses offered through cross-enrollment provide UC unit credit. Some courses are approved for GE, major preparation and/or, major credit or can be used as a substitute for a course at your campus.

If "unit credit" is listed by your campus, consult your department, academic adviser or Student Affairs division to inquire about the petition process for more than unit credit for the course.

UC Berkeley:
Unit Credit

UC Davis:
Unit Credit

UC Irvine:
Unit Credit

UC Los Angeles:
General Education: Life Sci, nonlab and Philosophical and Ling Analysis

UC Merced:
units toward degree (see your advisor)

UC Riverside:
General Education: Elective units
Course Equivalence: UCR LING 20 - LANGUAGE & LINGUISTICS

UC San Diego:
General Education: Revelle - one course toward Social Science; TMC 1 course toward lower division disciplinary breadth if noncontiguous to major; Sixth - 1 course towards Social Analysis; Warren - May be counted depending on major/PofC/AS; Muir: 1 course in a Social Sciences theme in "Language and Communication".

UC San Francisco:
Unit Credit

UC Santa Barbara:
General Education: Area E automatically upon completion
Course Equivalence: Likely equivalent to LING 20 after petition

UC Santa Cruz:
General Education: SI

Course Fees

none

More About The Course

Relevant Website

Course Creator

W.H. Torrence

Harold Torrence is an associate professor in the UCLA Linguistics Department.  He researches the morphology (word structure) and syntax (sentence structure) of languages in West Africa and Mesoamerica, where he travels to conduct fieldwork. Professor Torrence received his BA and BS from the University of Georgia and his Ph.D. at UCLA.  Before coming to UCLA, he worked at the University of Kansas.

Professor Torrence is interested in variation across languages. In his work, he tries to understand the properties that all languages have and to develop a clearer picture of the ways that languages differ from each other. The nearly 7000 living languages of the world present a vast array of apparent differences. In all of this complexity, are there universal principles or “laws of language” that determine how all human languages work? If so, what exactly are these principles and how can we figure out what they are? Professor Torrence’s work on understudied languages brings in fresh data to help solve some of the many questions that human language presents.

Harold Torrence  is an associate professor in the UCLA Linguistics Department.  He researches the morphology (word structure) and syntax (sentence structure) of languages in West Africa and Mesoamerica, where he travels to conduct fieldwork. Professor Torrence received his BA and BS from the University of Georgia and his Ph.D. at UCLA.  Before coming to UCLA, he worked at the University of ...

Harold Torrence is an associate professor in the UCLA Linguistics Department.  He researches the morphology (word structure) and syntax (sentence structure) of languages in West Africa and Mesoamerica, where he travels to conduct fieldwork. Professor Torrence received his BA and BS from the University of Georgia and his Ph.D. at UCLA.  Before coming to UCLA, he worked at the University of Kansas.

Professor Torrence is interested in variation across languages. In his work, he tries to understand the properties that all languages have and to develop a clearer picture of the ways that languages differ from each other. The nearly 7000 living languages of the world present a vast array of apparent differences. In all of this complexity, are there universal principles or “laws of language” that determine how all human languages work? If so, what exactly are these principles and how can we figure out what they are? Professor Torrence’s work on understudied languages brings in fresh data to help solve some of the many questions that human language presents.


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