Course Description

Water and Sanitation Justice, SOCY 173X

This course will explore the many manifestations of water and sanitation justice and injustice on interlocking scales (i.e. local, national, transnational) while illustrating analytical ideas connecting to a range of social processes including claims for human rights, deprivation and exclusion, urbanization and infrastructure development, and privatization of land and water. We will look at various case studies in high-income and low-income countries and use key technical and social concepts to examine rights, equity, and justice with respect to water and sanitation.

Key Information

Credit: 5 quarter units / 3.33 semester units credit
UC Santa Cruz, Sociology

Course Credit:

Upon successful completion, all online courses offered through cross-enrollment provide UC unit credit. Some courses are approved for GE, major preparation and/or, major credit or can be used as a substitute for a course at your campus.

If "unit credit" is listed by your campus, consult your department, academic adviser or Student Affairs division to inquire about the petition process for more than unit credit for the course.

UC Berkeley:
Unit Credit

UC Davis:
Unit Credit

UC Irvine:
General Education: III - Social and Behavioral Sciences

UC Los Angeles:
Major Requirement: UD elective for Sociology major

UC Merced:
Units toward degree (see your advisor)

UC Riverside:
General Education: Elective units

UC San Diego:
General Education: Revelle - one course towards Social Science requirement ; TMC 1 course toward upper division disciplinary breadth if noncontiguous to major; Warren - May be used depending on major/PofC/AS, Transfer students may use for UD noncontiguous GE depending on major, Seventh - 1 course towards Alternatives - Social Science; Muir: 1 course in a Social Sciences theme in "Culture, Society and Social Justice"

UC San Francisco:
Unit Credit

UC Santa Barbara:
General Education: This course will apply to Area D automatically upon completion
Major Requirement: Likely applicable toward upper-division Area B major requirement of Environmental Studies BA or BS after petition.

UC Santa Cruz:
General Education: PE-E
Major Requirement: satisfies upper division elective requirement for Sociology majors

Prerequisites

None

More About The Course

Relevant Website

Course Creators

Ben Crow
Ben Crow is a professor of Sociology at UC Santa Cruz. He trained and worked as an engineer in London and Africa, and was an activist and volunteer in South Asia, before becoming a social scientist. His PhD is from Edinburgh University in Scotland, and he taught at the Open University in UK and at Stanford and UC Berkeley before coming to UCSC. He has done research on conflict and cooperation over international rivers in South Asia, leading to a book Sharing the Ganges: the politics and technology of river development; on traders, township markets and the making of social classes in rural Bangladesh (Markets, Class and Social Change: Trading Networks and Poverty in South Asia); on global inequalities (The UC Atlas of Global Inequality (online) and The Atlas of Global Inequalities, with Suresh Lodha). Recent research studies how poor women, men and children gain access to water in urban slums in the global south, with a focus on cities in Kenya. He is in the early stages of a comparative study of cities in the south and north exploring ‘Urban capabilities and the transformation of women’s work.’  Ben Crow is a professor of Sociology at UC Santa Cruz. He trained and worked as an engineer in London and Africa, and was an activist and volunteer in South Asia, before becoming a social scientist. His PhD is from Edinburgh University in Scotland, and he taught at the Open University in UK and at Stanford and UC Berkeley before coming to UCSC. He has done research on conflict and cooperation ...

Ben Crow is a professor of Sociology at UC Santa Cruz. He trained and worked as an engineer in London and Africa, and was an activist and volunteer in South Asia, before becoming a social scientist. His PhD is from Edinburgh University in Scotland, and he taught at the Open University in UK and at Stanford and UC Berkeley before coming to UCSC. He has done research on conflict and cooperation over international rivers in South Asia, leading to a book Sharing the Ganges: the politics and technology of river development; on traders, township markets and the making of social classes in rural Bangladesh (Markets, Class and Social Change: Trading Networks and Poverty in South Asia); on global inequalities (The UC Atlas of Global Inequality (online) and The Atlas of Global Inequalities, with Suresh Lodha). Recent research studies how poor women, men and children gain access to water in urban slums in the global south, with a focus on cities in Kenya. He is in the early stages of a comparative study of cities in the south and north exploring ‘Urban capabilities and the transformation of women’s work.’ 

Abigail Brown
Abigail Brown was a Sociology PhD student at UC Santa Cruz. Her research interests include urban water and sanitation access, water and sanitation infrastructure, and urban planning and sustainable development. She holds a BSc in Environmental Studies from The Evergreen State College, an MSc in Water Resources Policy and Management from Oregon State University, and an MA in Sociology from UC Santa Cruz. Her master’s research focused on empowerment and gender equality around water and sanitation in rural India, and she conducted a collaborative research project evaluating equitable participation around groundwater decision-making in Central California. Abigail is a board member of Public Hygiene Lets Us Stay Human (www.phlush.org). Her professional background over the past ten years include positions evaluating surface and groundwater policies with state water agencies, conducting watershed restoration with non-profit organizations, and teaching about water issues with non-profits and universities. Abigail Brown  was a Sociology PhD student at UC Santa Cruz. Her research interests include urban water and sanitation access, water and sanitation infrastructure, and urban planning and sustainable development. She holds a BSc in Environmental Studies from The Evergreen State College, an MSc in Water Resources Policy and Management from Oregon State University, and an MA in Sociology from UC ...

Abigail Brown was a Sociology PhD student at UC Santa Cruz. Her research interests include urban water and sanitation access, water and sanitation infrastructure, and urban planning and sustainable development. She holds a BSc in Environmental Studies from The Evergreen State College, an MSc in Water Resources Policy and Management from Oregon State University, and an MA in Sociology from UC Santa Cruz. Her master’s research focused on empowerment and gender equality around water and sanitation in rural India, and she conducted a collaborative research project evaluating equitable participation around groundwater decision-making in Central California. Abigail is a board member of Public Hygiene Lets Us Stay Human (www.phlush.org). Her professional background over the past ten years include positions evaluating surface and groundwater policies with state water agencies, conducting watershed restoration with non-profit organizations, and teaching about water issues with non-profits and universities.

Kirsten Rudestam
Kirsten Rudestam completed her doctoral dissertation at the Department of Sociology at UC Santa Cruz. She is currently working as a research associate on an NSF funded groundwater justice project on the Central Coast of California. Kirsten's research interests are water policy and management, sense of place with respect to resource management practices, and the role of affect and emotion in environmental politics. Her doctoral research focused on the dynamics of contested land and water use practices within the Deschutes Basin of Central Oregon. Kirsten has an MSc in Environmental Science from the University of Oregon. Prior to her doctoral research, she spent two years co-directing the University of Oregon's Environmental Leadership Program. She has almost ten years of experience teaching environmental field courses for undergraduate college students in the western United States and is strongly motivated by her commitment to experiential education as a mode of radical environmental pedagogy. Kirsten Rudestam  completed her doctoral dissertation at the Department of Sociology at UC Santa Cruz. She is currently working as a research associate on an NSF funded groundwater justice project on the Central Coast of California. Kirsten's research interests are water policy and management, sense of place with respect to resource management practices, and the role of affect and emotion ...

Kirsten Rudestam completed her doctoral dissertation at the Department of Sociology at UC Santa Cruz. She is currently working as a research associate on an NSF funded groundwater justice project on the Central Coast of California. Kirsten's research interests are water policy and management, sense of place with respect to resource management practices, and the role of affect and emotion in environmental politics. Her doctoral research focused on the dynamics of contested land and water use practices within the Deschutes Basin of Central Oregon. Kirsten has an MSc in Environmental Science from the University of Oregon. Prior to her doctoral research, she spent two years co-directing the University of Oregon's Environmental Leadership Program. She has almost ten years of experience teaching environmental field courses for undergraduate college students in the western United States and is strongly motivated by her commitment to experiential education as a mode of radical environmental pedagogy.

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